A Travellerspoint blog

Seattle to Leavenworth (NOT the prison)

all seasons in one day 22 °C

We had a fairly relaxed day for the first one on the road, just 150 miles. The plan had been to visit the Boeing factory for the tour, but I failed to secure a booking, so we wandered around Seattle for a bit, then headed up to see what we could see at Boeing anyway. As we were driving towards the main factory, we noticed a big security fenced area and the tips of some planes, so went for a little look and ended up in what seemed to be an employee's car park with almost unrestricted views of a field full of planes. We really were not sure if they were waiting to be junked or were new.

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Since there was a shift change, there were plenty of people about to ask. These are all new planes, just getting their finishing touches before heading off to new owners. I had no idea that they'd ship these fellows around the country by train until I heard it here today - then I read about three that were derailed in Montana a month earlier. I have also read that about 80% of Boeing employees would not fly on the new Dreamliner, because of concerns about how they are put together. The guy we spoke to said that the normal Boeing staff have very little to nothing to do with making the Dreamliner, it is made by an all new crew. We probably gained a much better insight into the workings of the place from this 20 minute chat than we would have on the actual tour.

After a quick coffee in a very old fashioned place in Everett, it was time to hit the road - US Highway 2, going East (if you go west from Everett, you'll be in Puget Sound within about 3 minutes, and that's walking). There were quite a few small towns and shopping centres but eventually the road cleared and we were running through the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest past (I think) the Skykomish River.

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The road peaked at Stevens Pass, where there were several lodges and ski lifts heading in all directions. No snow, of course, but the place was furious with mountain bikers.

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My original plan had been to stay at Wenatchee, but when I saw that quite a few people were staying there just to be close to Leavenworth (and I worked out that the prison is in Kansas) I started wondering what it was about Leavenworth - what I discovered intrigued me enough to make a booking, and there was only one place I wanted to stay there, because I thought we would be quite secure.

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Leavenworth was originally a railroad town (named after the fellow who owned the land it was built on, named by that fellow too), then a forest town but it was struggling so in the early 1960's, someone had the great idea of recreating it as a Bavarian Alpine town -and it worked, is still going strong 50 years later. The whole central town is done in a similar style, and it has various bars doing a beer and sausage combo (very tasty, too), and a couple of "bier gartens" which looked a bit sad because they really need to be full of jovial drinking folk, not a couple of families having a hotdog supper. All in all, I really enjoyed my stay in Leavenworth - I could cope with a relaxing week there.

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That prime rib is looking a lot more raw than it did at the time.

Posted by NZBarry 18.09.2014 22:28 Archived in USA Tagged roadtrip 2014 Comments (0)

Victoria to Seattle

sunny 25 °C

From Victoria, I had a 7500 mile mission to accomplish in about three weeks. It started with a ferry. Again, I had a choice: take the Victoria Clipper

Victoria Cliipper

Victoria Cliipper

(which has a bit of a reputation as an inducer of vomit) to Seattle or a somewhat slower route on the more traditional ferry, the Coho.

The goodship Como

The goodship Como

Leaving Victoria

Leaving Victoria

I chose the latter, which took me directly south across the Strait of Juan de Fuca to a smallish town (19,000 people) to the north of the Olympic National Park, Port Angeles, in a couple of hours. This involved a border crossing into the USA, which was performed painlessly as I got on the ferry.

Although you wouldn't know it walking around, Port Angeles is the largest pre-historic Indian village and burial site in the USA: they started an ambitious development project about a decade ago and found the remains of hundreds of bodies, many who apparently died suddenly - the theory is they were hit by disease when they first encountered Europeans. Now, the town has a central business area running just a couple of blocks back from the harbour, although it sprawls away up the hill for a considerable distance. I know this, because I walked the 2 kilometres up to the rather pleasant and quite new library (why it is so far from town, I have no idea).

By the time I returned to town after a day's labour, town was pretty much dead. I walked around a bit to find somewhere to eat - although there were maybe half a dozen places open, only one had any people in it: the oddly named Next Door Gastropub (which I wanted to avoid purely on the basis of its name) was heaving. Luckily, I got the one spot going at the bar - they had a great selection of beers, so I settled in with a couple and a good burger and was very happy. A couple of guys next to me were geologists up from Colorado to do some work in the bush and we entertained each other for a fair while. Good times. I even got to stay in a very traditional sort of American hotel, the Downtown.

Port Angeles Downtown Hotel

Port Angeles Downtown Hotel

Once again the internet was wrong in telling me that the way to get to Seattle was on an expensive ($37) and rather small bus. When I asked the fellow in the hotel where to find it, he sent me to the public transit station, where I discovered that the various counties all run a sequence of public buses which sort of connected and would get me to Seattle. Sure, it was precisely two hours slower than the $37 alternative but (a) it cost me something like $5 and (b) the 2 hours were caused by a gap in the connections between the buses at a place called Port Townsend, which turned out to have perhaps the most perfect bus stop in the world so my 2 hours were very pleasurable. First, I found the Sunrise Coffee Roasters, a very cosy place to hang out. Just across the way was something even better - the Port Townsend Brewery Shop, which had about a dozen beers available in tasing glasses - I got through at least half. In between, if I had been hungry, there was a taco stand.

I am not at all sure why, but the only photos I took at this stage were as we crossed from one the mainland to an island. We crossed to another island and it was on to the Bainbridge ferry to Seattle, which took 30 minutes (just long enough for a beer, if you were lucky enough not to get stuck in the queue, which took 30 minutes to clear).

Squamish Harbour

Squamish Harbour

Bridge over Squamish Harbour

Bridge over Squamish Harbour

Seattle Cranes

Seattle Cranes

I actually had two visits to Seattle, and spent a total of four nights there, although two were in a Motel 6 near the airport. My plan had been to stay in a famous old hotel in the old downtown, the Panama but at the last minute my booking got cancelled, so I was in the hostel instead - a hostel I really didn't warm to. I didn't really see much locally I wanted to eat, so started walking, first around the neighbourhood and ultimately up as far as Pike Place Market. I saw a lot of buildings I liked, but I think my favourate of them all was the Seattle Public library (unfortunately, the one day I had to spend in Seattle, it was closed for a public holiday).

NP Hotel

NP Hotel

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Cheap Digs?

Cheap Digs?

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King County Detention Centre

King County Detention Centre

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Seattle Central Library

Seattle Central Library

Seattle Central Library

Seattle Central Library

Merchants Cafe

Merchants Cafe

Merchants Cafe is the oldest continually operating restaurant in Seattle, but it looked so unwelcoming and basically had it that I was not even tempted to go in.

The market was closed (although I did get to see it on my second visit), but there are a couple of streets which are packed with various cafes and restaurants nearby - including the original Starbucks (which had a queue out the door and halfway down the street) and an equally popular place selling chowder. I settled on a French place, and saw some of the best customer service I have ever seen. As I knew, most of the hotels were full - there was a guy in the restaurant who had decided to leave it after dinner to arrange somewhere to stay. Then he settled in at the bar with his laptop to book a hotel: at least half an hour later, he was still looking. The restaurant people got themselves involved in helping him, and in about 5 minutes a bloke turned up in a full hotel doorkeep uniform to escort the fellow to his hotel.

When I did get to see the market, I had company as my brother had flown in to join me: we didn't really linger very long, as there were so many people and we had a plan. We wandered outside the market a bit, and were impressed by the bright colours in a mexican grocery shop. I was also impressed with a ginger beer shop, mainly because someone could open a shop just selling ginger beer, although there was some product diversity, as there were about 20 flavours, all of which were available on tap.

Pike Place Market

Pike Place Market

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Rachel's Ginger Beer

Rachel's Ginger Beer

Mexican Grocery

Mexican Grocery

Mexican Grocery

Mexican Grocery

When I got back to Seattle, I had another night back in the unpleasant hostel and finally got to at least hang out in the Panama Hotel - it is a National Historic Landmark Building, because of its association with Japanese immigration to America a century ago. I didn't see it, but it has one of two remaining Japanese bathhouses in the USA in its basement. What I did see was its coffee shop, which has a collection of memorabilia and is quite a cool place to hang out. The building itself was unremarkable.

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Posted by NZBarry 14.09.2014 14:31 Archived in USA Comments (0)

Victoria

sunny 25 °C

The internet tried to tell me that the only way from Vancouver to Victoria was by way of a fancy, expensive tour bus. The internet was wrong. I caught a train, two public buses and a ferry and I was in Downtown Victoria, albeit without my luggage.

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Victoria Water Taxi

Victoria Water Taxi

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The first story the ferry company tried to tell me was that I needn't worry, my bag was on the fancy tour bus. Nope, that wasn't right. Eventually they confessed that while I was on the ferry from Tsawwassen to Swartz Bay, my bag had gone on a frolic of its own, and went by ferry to somewhere called Duke Point. 24 hours and another trip out to the ferry terminal and I finally had my bag.

I liked Vancouver, but when I saw Victoria, I was blown away. Yes, it is touristy, but that is because it sits on a very pretty harbour and had great old buildings. Right in the apex of the city it has the British Columbia Parliament (who thought Vancouver was the capital? I did.) and the grand old Fairmont Empress Hotel. I really did mean to go hang out in the verandah bar there, maybe drink a G&T or fancy cocktail, but somehow it never happened. Too late, I also found out there is a public restaurant in the basement of the Parliament, which would have been fun.

Victoria Harbour

Victoria Harbour

Victoria Harbour

Victoria Harbour

BC Legislature

BC Legislature

BC Legislature

BC Legislature

Fairmont Empress

Fairmont Empress

Fairmont Empress

Fairmont Empress

Fairmont Empress

Fairmont Empress

When I saw all that Victoria had to offer, I almost regretted not staying right amongst it, but I was happy where I was - I booked a room through Airbnb in a suburb called Fernwood, which had a tiny village centre with a handful of shops, a nice cafe, the Fernwood Inn (where I found myself more than once of an evening soaking up one of their hoppiest brews) and a playhouse.

Fernwood Inn

Fernwood Inn

Belfry Theatre, Fernwood

Belfry Theatre, Fernwood

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Every day and evening I'd walk a different way between home and town, and find that there were shops and cafes just randomly dotted throughout the area. One of the best cafes I found through this process is the Parsonage Cafe, roaster of Fernwood coffee and an absolute hive of industry - I sat there one morning eating my breakfast, thinking it was a bit warm, wondering how the three in the tiny kitchen, who were awlays on the move, were coping - pretty sure I wouldn't have. Just down the street, I found its counterpart: Yokas. This is a roastery and honey and chocolate dispensary run by a retired couple from Vancouver - they seemed surprised I wanted not just a cup of coffee but to sit down and drink it. While I was there, the only custom was to buy beans, chocolate and honey and to discuss a big housing development I think they were all opposing. But my fave coffee place in Victoira would have to be Discovery, just because the environment was so ramshackle, a lot like the living room of someone a bit eccentric.

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Parsonage Cafe, Fernwood

Parsonage Cafe, Fernwood

Parsonage Cafe, Fernwood

Parsonage Cafe, Fernwood

Yokas Coffee and Honey

Yokas Coffee and Honey

Discovery Coffee

Discovery Coffee

Discovery Coffee

Discovery Coffee

Discovery Coffee

Discovery Coffee

Apart from the harbour area, the part I was most impressed with was Oldtown - the original core of Victoria, with great old buildings, the oldest (and tiniest) Chinatown, interesting murals and shops - I'd say I wandered through this part every day. Market Square was at the centre of it all, and has been renovated. Other old buildings in the area are being done up, not torn down, to be apartments.

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Oldtown Victoria

Oldtown Victoria

Old Town Victoria

Old Town Victoria

Market Square

Market Square

Market Square

Market Square

Swans Hotel

Swans Hotel

Swans Hotel

Swans Hotel

Chinatown Victoria

Chinatown Victoria

Chinatown Victoria

Chinatown Victoria

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I went out to University of Victoria one day (I could not use their internet, so went to the public library the rest of the time). Again, I was surprised at the lack of grandeur in their buildings - all pretty functional - but the campus itself was well laid out and had a fabulous central green space, with a fountain, seats, totem pole and the like. I had planned to stay in the area to watch a movie at the local shopping precinct, thinking it would be a lively place to hang out - it was so dull, that the most exciting place was Tim Hortons. So, still haven't seen a movie since I left (apart from on the plane).

U Vic

U Vic

U Vic

U Vic

Totem, U Vic

Totem, U Vic

On my first night in town, I went into the bottle shop of the Strathcona Hotel to get some beers in: the person who served me must have spent at least 20 minutes helping me select my half dozen (I ended up taking her advice and buying a local style called Indian Session Ale - hoppy but lowish alcohol). Since you don't tip people who sell you stuff, or those who make it, just those who bring it to you, I decided I owed it to the Strathcona to come back for dinner - their Sticky Wicket was a great place to dine, lots of energy, plenty of good beers on tap and nice food (I dipped my toes for the first time into eating fish tacos). Only a couple of other meals were truly memorable - the burger at Pink Bicycle and, on my last night in town, the great Italian food I had at Fiamo Italian Kitchen. There is a fish and chip shop in a container on the wharf which has a bit of a rep, but when I went past, the queue was so long I couldn't even see the shop. So, I wandered around - there was a dragon boat festival happening, and quite a few musicians busking - including one girl who was much smaller than her instrument, but still seemed to do a good job.

Queue for fish and chips

Queue for fish and chips

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Finally, since they don't really fit in anywhere else (and indeed, one of them wouldn't even fit the frame on my camera), my last pictures are somewhat opposed to each other - a convent and an armoury.

St Ann's Academy

St Ann's Academy

St Ann's Academy

St Ann's Academy

Bay Street Armoury

Bay Street Armoury

Bay Street Armoury

Bay Street Armoury

Bay Street Armoury

Bay Street Armoury

Posted by NZBarry 12.09.2014 22:25 Archived in Canada Comments (0)

Vancouver

sunny 24 °C

It has been a while - I have been doing a lot of travelling. In my last post, I concluded with the six hour wait on the tarmac at Manila airport, while they cleared away the other flight which had mis-judged and ran off the runway. I have to say that the crew onboard my Philippines Air plane were exceptional - giving us a snack when it became clear we would not be leaving, sorting out dinner as soon as we levelled off and coping very well with the fact their shift was suddenly six hours longer than expected. I was thinking that if I had been on Air NZ or Qantas, pesky labour laws would have intervened and we'd need a crew change before leaving - I hope PAL suitably looked after our crew.

The plan had been to arrive in Vancouver at a civilised time but, thanks to the delay, it was close to midnight before I finally arrived at my hostel, where I received a cheerful welcome. Luckily it was just off the lively Davie Street, so there were plenty of options for a quiet beer and dinner: there were two burger bars virtually opposite each other, each boasting the best burgers in town but since Vera's was the only one actually open, it was definitely the best on the night. One thing I noticed pretty quickly as I wandered around that evening was the smell of weed - a guy I spoke to in a bar said they have a pretty relaxed attitude to it in Vancouver, and I saw several places advertising themselves as medicinal cannabis lounges, yet the same guy said that there is a zero tolerance attitude to a very kiwi experience, drinking beer at the beach. No smoking on beaches is tolerated either.

I spent a week in Vancouver, and enjoyed the city. My main reason for being downtown was to use the magnificent central library. It was so big, enclosed in a circular sheath, that I never got an adequate photo of it. The library itself was squared off, so with the resulting crescent, they made a six story atrium and put in a row of cafes and the like.

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I occupied my days and evenings working, hunting for the best coffee shops and food and generally wandering about. In terms of the coffee hunt, oddly enough, my favourite was out at the University of British Columbia - a good strong brew. The campus was otherwise curiously lacking in interest - mainly modern low-rise buildings. I also found that there were many local brews of ginger ale, and while they tasted fairly similar to each other, one stood out for its label.

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Each day, I would set off on a different street to get to my destination. Downtown Vancouver is on a small finger of land, a carbuncle if you like, between Vancouver Harbour and English Bay. The quadrant below the hostel was all proper downtown - skyscrapers, offices, department stores,

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the library etc - but I spent little time there apart from to work and drink coffee: once I even had the pleasure of catching up with an old friend over a posh sandwich for lunch. I did enjoy Gastown - it is the oldest part of Vancouver, essentially between the train station and the water-front: It has had a checkered past - it bunrt down completely about 20 years after it was first built, they started again and it became the premier commercial district, but was hit hard by the depression so that it was just "cheap beer parlours, flophouse hotels, and loggers hiring halls" and just got worse through until the 1960's, when people started to think "something must be done", and it was. It has been re-vitalised with interesting shops, bars, cafes and food places.

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They had something like 51 tap beers at the Lamplighter - I could only really do justice to one of them, and then proceeded down the street for some delicious BBQ brisket at Peckinpah.

The quadrant above the hostel was more residential, and I really enjoyed wandering through those streets - some of the houses were quite grand. At the very end of the finger is the enormous, wooded Stanley Park, which I did visit and I am sure I had photos, but I can't find them. That particular walk took me to the beginning of Denman Street, where I had been told there were good fish and chips. I found them

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along with many more casual and cheerful eateries - it was a very pleasant street to walk along, and culminated in a complete surprise: English Bay. Lots of people were there, just hanging, watching each other or the boats or the various performers or the sculptures I now know to be called A-maze-ing Laughter, which are apparently portraits of the artist in states of hysterical laughter (and I just thought they were freaks!).

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And then there is Vancouver Harbour - most days I would walk along its edge at some point, but on about the second day I was intrigued to find a very busy sea-plane port - there were always a couple lined up to land, another couple taking off and a couple moving about on the water. They did touristy flights which were quite expensive and limited in what I could do, but I found that over the weekend, they had special fares between Vancouver and various points - Nanaimo (home of the variant of the caramel slice) offered the cheapest option, so I signed on. Now, I hate things like ski-lifts and have been known to have minor panic attacks at the tops of hills, so I wondered how I would react to a tiny 14 seater plane taking off in water: it was absolutely fine.

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The last three are of the main street in Nainamo, a hotel and the top of its courthouse. I have to say that I didn't really give it a fair shake of the stick, as I was feeling considerably under the weather - after a coffee and cursory look at the museum, I retreated to the sea-plane port to wait for my plane, then spent most of the afternoon, slumped in a chair in the hostel. Next day, I was fine again and ready for more adventures.

Posted by NZBarry 06.09.2014 16:56 Archived in Canada Comments (0)

Manila

rain 27 °C

The Philippines have never aroused any interest in me to visit them, but when I found that the cheapest way to move on (by far - like 50%) was via Manila, I thought it would be interesting to stop over for a couple of days. Cebu Pacific had me in Manila before I knew it - almost literally, as I had become convinced it was a four hour flight but it is around half that. The arrival terminal was huge, quite new, and seriously under-used.

Then the fun began, as I had to get myself into the city - I'd read awkward arrangaments can be made involving unmarked buses which drop you whoknowswehere, and was very wary of the taxis. My theory is that the more insistent they are to get you to take their taxi, the more likely it is you are being ripped off. I knew the official metered rate into town - of all the taxi drivers who pestered me to use their services, the only one who gave any idea of price was charging well over four times the metered rate.

So, I walked, not the whole way - just about 3 km over poorly formed footpaths, dragging my bag behind me. At least it was much cooler than in Hong Kong. I had maybe 100 taxis (not joking) want to give me a lift, some were extremely persistent in their attentions. My first contact with normal locals was when I popped into the good old 7-11 for a cold drink - the guy behind the counter (as he did with everyome who came in) boomed out a "Good day, welcome, come in". I stood around with my drink - there were a couple of young kids begging, but mostly it was just people going about their business. There was a fellow who could not speak sitting at the seats - he gestured for me to take a load off. After the 7-11, the road went up through a sort of street market - there was still traffic, including lots of the famed jeepneys,

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but it was moving more slowly than me. Eventually, I saw what I was looking for - the jutting end of an elevated railroad, part of a project to link the airport with the centre by rail which has been caught up in political intrigue and corruption, so no-one can say if and when it will get finished. Rather than get on immediately,I celebrated my arrival with some fried chicken at Jolibees. On the train, there were three girls, teenagers, standing beside me, presumably speaking Tagalog, but I did get the gist of part of their conversation: one of them is coming to New Zealand to study and that revelation operated as a comedic thunderbolt - her two friend almost hit their heads on the ground, they were laughing so much, and then the intending student joined in.

At the other end, I had about another km to walk, but this was easy, as I walked straight through a rather nice park and into my fabulous hotel:

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I had a voucher to redeem for a night in a hotel, worth $US130, which was almost exactly what the grand Manila Hotel cost. William Taft decreed that it was to be built, and it was, in 1912. MacArthur moved in for six years during the war as special military advisor to President Quezon and then used it as his command post when America joined the war. Being the best place in town for a long long time, many famous people have passed through its doors, from Nixon to Clinton to Bhutto, from the Beatles to the 2011 American idol finalists and, of course, me. The place was so incredibly nice, the staff so gracious, that it seemed a shame to even go outside (if I had known it was the middle of rainy season, I might not have). In fact the first night, I stayed in for dinner, had some adobo (marinated meat) and a tasty dark version of San Miguel and marvelled at the lobby, which was a bit beyond my normal range of experiences.

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I was super impressed when I complained at about 11:30 at night that the internet was not working - they sent up a tech immediately who installed a router right in my room: problem sorted. In the morning I wandered out the back of the hotel, behind its pool, and had a small mystery solved - I knew I could not be far from the coast, but had seen no sign of it. This is what is immediately behind the hotel

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I spent the day wandering the Old Quarter, Intramuros: it is on a rivermouth, so people have lived here for centuries, but it was the Spaniards who decided upon a walled city, which was built in the 16th century, damaged heavily during the War (not all the marks made have been repaired or healed). Fort Santiago was built in the river mouth - there is not a whole lot of it left - the reconstructed moat, the walls and associated features like guardhouses and a couple of subordinate buildings.

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Here I learned about one José Rizal, who was incarcerated by the Spaniards in the chapel, tried for treason and put to death by firing squad. There are suggestions he was falsely found guilty, but that seems to undermine him: he worked strenuously to get rid of Spanish rule, fomenting discord, causing difficulties for the Spaniards - I can see why they might convict him, and it made him a martyr. Apart from his cell and the courtroom, his final walk out to his death has been re-created, with various groups of mourners.

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Lunchtime - beside the Fort, there was a line of restaurants, all selling very similar products, but this sign was the winner

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The business started during the war: apparently Max was doing a roaring trade selling fried chicken out of his home, and the business he was convinced to start is still going strong. The food was terrible, but the staff was entertaining - there were several young guys and mainly just the one girl on the floor with them: they were constantly teasing and flirting with her (and she gave as good as she got) and play fighting with each other. There was also the cashier, an older woman: the guys would try to tease her, and she'd have none of it, remaining all stern and businesslike, until the strain of being serious got too much, and she'd crack up as well. It looked like they were having a lot of fun with each other, and managed to keep serving the customers.

This shop was near the former residence of the Governor, the soon to be Treasury and a couple of other cool buildings.

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I wanted to see the rest of Intramuros, but the rain got the better of me - I spent at least 30 minutes huddled under a small pice of canvas which was a sort of verandah for a tiny shop - by the time the rain cleared, the water had pooled so deeply I could not carry on, and had to make some lateral moves. I got about two blocks, when the rain started again - at least I had a proper shelter. A couple of uni students wanted me to take refuge in the church - when they couldn't get me to move, they had me do a pretty long survey about the tourist infrastructure and environmental protection measures of Manila - like I knew much about either topic! But they were sweet and thought my input would be valuable. The rain still hadn't gone off so I was eventually persuaded by a young girl to join her family in the museum across the road - I must have sat there at least an hour, waiting for the rain to stop, looking at this.

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When it did, the sensible thing would have been to hurry back to the hotel, but I saw cake and a coffee machine, and that was the end of me being sensible, which resulted in yet another wait for the rain to stop. I had to find out what a chocolate cappucino was - it was important research (hot chocolate, but with milk frothed as with a cappucino, as it happens).

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On my last morning, I maintained an anxious weather watch and decided I'd leave early and walk from the end of the train line - the departure terminal was not the same one I had arrived at and careful scrutiny of satellite images revaled good wide footpaths, so I thought I'd be fine. And I was, right up to the point that I could see the entrance to the airport when the rain came tumbling down - luckily I had another shop with a wee canvas verandah. Only real problem was that I'd walked to the wrong bloody terminal. A policeman (or maybe security guard) got me into a taxi, telling me it would be 200 pesos - the driver laughed and told me he'd never forget me when I showed him I only had 86. He took the lot, and of course the metered fare was more like 60.

This terminal had the worst food facilities I have ever come across - three stalls selling near identical products, two cigar stalls and a pathetic duty free counter. I really wanted a beer after allmy exertions and it wasn't until I'd walked the lentgh of the terminal twice that I discovered they had put the bar inside the smoking area - oh well, the beer was cheap.

Philippine Air, despite being very cheap, was not a bad airline to fly with. There was an incident on the runway, in which a Saudi plane couldn't handle the wet and skidded off. That delayed our flight - the airline kept us informed of develpments and after about 90 minutes did a snack service. They said they'd even do dinner service if the problem persisted, but that didn't seem a good idea to me, as we'd not be able to take off with iour tray tables down and dinner half eaten. As it happens, we were stuck in the plane on the tarmac for SIX HOURS before we could finally take off. Then we had dinner.

These are a few of the photos I took as I wandered around Intramuros and then from my hotel room, which overlooked it.

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Posted by NZBarry 21.08.2014 01:10 Archived in Philippines Comments (0)

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