A Travellerspoint blog

Winnipeg: A Walking Tour

sunny 23 °C

My only reason for stopping at Winnipeg was that it is roughly half way between Vancouver and Toronto. I had basically done nothing to find out what it might offer, although of course I know it is the capital of Manitoba, so would not be one of those blink and you miss it sort of places - that would be a terrible way to spend four days between trains. At one place we stopped, the most lively place was the fire-station - someone had obviously left the lights on when they went to bed. The banner proclaiming some event which happened in this town in 2007 was still up.

My first impressions of Winnipeg were not great: the train station is on Main Street, and Portage and Broadway are the two major streets running off Main. I was staying on Maryland, which ran between them a bit over a kilometre away from Main, so it seemed logical to do a circuit - up Broadway and back along Portage. That is a very uninspiring walk: small sad shopping malls, dejected commercial buildings, a near deserted Bay department store, old and run down flats with just a few bright lights. I thought that maybe spending four days here would prove to be a big mistake: that was compounded by chasing up a highly reputed burger and finding it to be one of the worst I have ever eaten; dry, with a very odd flavour and texture. I described it to Tara that it was as if they'd taken a meat patty and tried to make it look and taste vegetarian - she laughed at the idea that I would have even gone to this place.

The thing is that my walk there opened my eyes to the possibility that maybe there were some good things to see in Winnipeg: by the time I left town, I'd had a fabulous time. So what I'm going to do is collate the various things I did and saw into a single circuit. My street, to be fair, was a bit sketchy - I had a homeless person outside my house congratulate me on finding a place to live, there were various people shouting at each other, sometimes at no-one at all. One block over, on Sherbrook Street, everything changed. First stop for me is the Winnipeg institution, Stellas, a bakery and cafe where I had an enormous breakfast of chorizo, egg, hash, peppers and toast - there was no way I could finish. Their bakery products are in cafes all over town: delicious chocolate croissants are my predominant memory. Just a bit down the street, I noticed some gentlemen in Victorian garb with old-fashioned bicycles, including a pennyfarthing - it was the Tweed ride, where the dress code was

newsboy caps, vests, knickers, pantaloons, cardigans and bow ties. Pipes, monocles, mutton-chop sideburns and handlebar moustaches are also a nice touch. Ladies will look sweet upon their bike seats in full-length skirts, high-necked blouses and flapper-style hats, perhaps twirling a parasol.

Tweed Ride assemblage

Tweed Ride assemblage


They were outside Thom Barger's cafe - a very minimalist look but good coffee.
Thom Barger's

Thom Barger's


One evening, they had the Sherbrook Street/Broadway intersection blocked off for the Sherbrook Street Festival - a stage was set up, and I spent a great hour or so listening to the Nathan Music Company, which is actually a band, a good one, they even featured a theremin for a couple of songs. There are five members in the band, but I could never get them all in the frame. They don't use the term in their self-description, but they could be called post-western, as they reference the normal tropes of western music and then say society has moved on, become much more urban (stripmalls rather than smoky saloons). Although there was a pretty big crowd and they were giving free t-shirts to the best dancer, they only had one taker, a tiny wee tot of a two year old girl.
Nathan Music Company

Nathan Music Company

Nathan Music Company

Nathan Music Company

Nathan Music Company

Nathan Music Company

Nathan Music Company

Nathan Music Company

Dancing Tot

Dancing Tot

Mural

Mural


About a kilometre from home Sherbrook Street crosses the Assiniboine River, and things get a bit posh. The river loops, and the south bank had been a single estate owned by a fellow called Munson who built a grand mansion there. The land itself has become a city park, and a very pleasant spot it is, but there have been quite a few grand houses built along this stretch of the river in the meantime.
Munson Park

Munson Park

Munson Park

Munson Park

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Corydon Avenue, the location of my bad burger experience, is actually where most of the city's cool cafes and bars are, including a couple of good burger places. I stopped a couple of times at another minimalist case, the You and Me. I have no idea what the customers are doing in one of these shots.
Corydon Avenue

Corydon Avenue

You and Me Cafe

You and Me Cafe

You and Me Cafe

You and Me Cafe

You and Me Cafe

You and Me Cafe


There are about three blocks of interest, then it is time to go up Osborne, which has its own collection of interesting shops, cafes, good burger outlets and the like. If you're not distracted by them, there's another decent cafe back on Broadway, the Fyxx, which has really nice staff. A short detour from here will get you to the four storey Winnipeg Library Place (i.e. its central library), which has done something rather neat. It has a staircase going from the ground to the top in one run - to the left is the library collection, to the right a series of stepped study spaces. I spent a day working in one of these.
Osborne Street

Osborne Street

Central library

Central library


What simply cannot be missed is the State Legislature and its grounds. It is open to the public to go in and wander around until 8:00 in the evening - I found various Ministerial doors, but never that of the Premier, just that of his Deputy. On my visit, there was quite a lot of singing - a local operatic group was rehearsing Cosi fan Tutti, which it will be performing on the Legislature's staircase.
Manitoba Legislature

Manitoba Legislature

Steps into Manitoba Legislature

Steps into Manitoba Legislature

Manitoba Legislature - Side view

Manitoba Legislature - Side view

Manitoba Legislature

Manitoba Legislature

Interior of Dome, Manitoba Legislature

Interior of Dome, Manitoba Legislature

Interior, Manitoba Legislature

Interior, Manitoba Legislature

Deputy Premier

Deputy Premier

Corridors of Power

Corridors of Power

Opera in the Parliament

Opera in the Parliament


Outside, there are various statues - Queen Victoria, the Famous Five (a group of five women, led by Nellie McClung) who fought for the right of women to be members of the Legislature.
Queen Vic

Queen Vic

Famous/Valiant Five

Famous/Valiant Five

Bison inside Manitoba Legislature

Bison inside Manitoba Legislature

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There is more, but I think I'll do another post.

Posted by NZBarry 07:25 Archived in Canada Comments (0)

Train Across Canada - Seattle to Winnipeg

After dropping the car off and meandering around Seattle, where I had some great Thai food in, of all places, a mall and stayed a final night, I caught the Amtrak Cascades up to Vancouver. The weather was dull and turned to rain before we got to Vancouver, but even on a nice day I doubt that the trip up the coast would have been very impressive, whichsurprised me as this trip has a bit of a reputation.
View from train: Pacific Coast

View from train: Pacific Coast


View from train: Pacific Coast

View from train: Pacific Coast


View from train: Pacific Coast

View from train: Pacific Coast


The train was confortble and had decent wifi, so instead of being blown away by the sights, I did some reading and used the wifi. In Vancouver, I took a final walk around, did some work in the library and was on the Via Rail train with what I thought was plenty of time to spare. I was a little surprised when it seemed to be leaving half an hour early - turns out, it was just pulling up the track a bit so it could back on to the long line of sleeper cars. There were just the two cars with seats (even allowing a pair of seats for every passenger, there were still spares) a snack car, followed by two restaurant cars then at least a dozen sleeper cars - most, I understand, occupied by tour groups. I figured that the stretch to Toronto would be too long to do in one hit, so chose to get off in Winnipeg - two nights later.
Pacific Central Station, Vancouver

Pacific Central Station, Vancouver

Pacific Central Station, Vancouver

Pacific Central Station, Vancouver

Pacific Central Station, Vancouver

Pacific Central Station, Vancouver

Via Rail Train

Via Rail Train


Via Rail Train

Via Rail Train


The enforced stillness on the train was great for unwinding - I finally started in on a book again that I had first began reading last November - Lawrence Durell's The Alexandria Quartet. As might be expected, it is a four part novel set in Alexandria, written in the 1950's and 60's but set before and during WWII. The first novel, Justine, documents the narrator's greatlove with one Justine, but it is hardly a straight-forward narrative. There is an underlying text, written by Justine's first husband to document their love, there are bits of other texts read by the narrator and some of his flights of fancy together with the contemporary story. In addition, there are pieces inserted from real author's - an Alexandrian poet Constantin Cavafy for example - and a real evocation of the city itself. It did get a bit confusing keeping these threads straight in my head, but there were so many fabulous passages of writing I had to carry on. In the second novel, the narrator has sent his manuscript to a mate to read: it has come back heavily annotated and with some important revelations, and so this is the second version of the first novel. One of Durrell's notions was the contingent nature of reality.

For light relief, I had all five series of Breaking Bad on my laptop, although I'm rationing myself to no more than one episode a day.

Of course, the train provided its own pleasures - the snack bar for a decent beer at most times of the day and night, the dining car when the demands of the sleeper car passengers allowed those of us in steerage to buy a meal there (I managed three),
Restaurant Car

Restaurant Car


my fellow passengers and, most of all, the world passing by outside. At breakfast on the first morning, I was seated with a couple from Regina, Saskatchewen: she was not the friendliest but he always took the time to chat when we met each other. I spent a lot of time in the dome - the snack car was on two levels, with the upper level being almost entirely walled and roofed in glass - and it was very social up there. I even commandeered one of the tables as a very scenic office, as there was not a whole lot of variation in the scenery and there was a French passenger who was leaping up to take a photo whenever there was something to be seen: as long as I kept my eye on her, which was not exactly painful, I had warning of things to see.
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The train heads north to Jasper, where we actually stopped for a couple of hours (intentionally) - time to walk around the very small town centre a couple of times, stock up on food from the wee supermarket, get a very strong coffee from the cafe/laundromat/internet cafe and buy dinner from the Mexican cafe (which provided an odd, pasta-based Mexican dish which was very tasty. Once back at the train, it didn't exactly leave on time:once on the way, it is a slight bump up to Edmonton and then down through vast Saskatchewen to Winnipeg. It is practically all forest, apart from the lakes and mountains. Edmonton was a particularly aggravating stop - we were told we could get off to stretch our legs for 10 minutes and hustled back on to the train. We did leave. Three times - going across the bridge and then back to the station. Third time was not the trick - we then sat in the station for an hour. There was talk among the train crew that someone was in the car park, trying to jump the train, a blacktop was on its way - I hope that was not what held us up.

One of the more notable landmarks passed by the train is Mt Robson, the most prominent and highest mountain in the Rockies. A guy on the train said that it isn't the tallest mountain in Canada (that is Mt Logan) but it climbs the highest from the surrounding terrain. Later on, after all the effort my brother and I had spent trying to see some bear, it was a bit of an anti-climax to see a couple of them wandering past the train tracks.
Mt Robson

Mt Robson


Mt Robson

Mt Robson


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View from train - a BEAR!

View from train - a BEAR!


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Old grain silo, Saskatchewen

Old grain silo, Saskatchewen

There were other hold ups, periods where we had to wait for trains comiing: one guy who works for CNR I got talking tp said there are a couple of trains each way which are two miles (the railway is not metric) long, so cannot be put on sidings.

But I thoroughly enjoyed the trip, the staff were great (they even offered to make phone calls for me), I ate well, I even slept OK in a normal reclining seat. So although we were four hours late into Winnipeg, it really didn't bother me - apart from the fact I was unsure about my accomodation. I was not staying in a hotel, but someone's house through AirBNB - Tara told me she liked to go to bed at 10:30, and here I was arriving after midnight. She was very obliging - although both she and a security guard I encountered did not like my chances of finding dinner, apart from what I could scrounge at the 7-11. What neither of them knew was that a new Chinese restaurant had opened, the Hong Kong Harbour, which stayed open until 2:00. So I was able to get a very pleasant dish - they called it Szechuan beef, but it was more like spicey sweet orange beef - and a beer.
Szechuan Beef, Hong Kong Harbour Restaurant

Szechuan Beef, Hong Kong Harbour Restaurant

Posted by NZBarry 22:48 Archived in Canada Comments (0)

End of Roadtrip: Moscow - Seattle

sunny 25 °C

So, this was the last day of our travels together - about 370 miles. After a quick swoop through Moscow, which even on a quiet Sunday morning looked to me like a nice town, we went in and had a sneaky look at the University of Idaho, which is headquarted here. I have visited a few Unis in my time, but this is the first one where I have been so conscious of the Greek (i.e. fraternity and sorority) housing - there were whole streets of them. The University itself was founded here in 1889 with 40 students and one professor, so is actually a bit younger than my own Uni. I'm not entirely sure what happened to those 40 students as only 4 graduated. There was a major fire in 1906 which required a new Administration building, desiged by the architect who designed the State Capitol - the idea was to build a grand building in order to make people think it is a grand University.
University of Idaho, Moscow

University of Idaho, Moscow

University of Idaho, Moscow

University of Idaho, Moscow

University of Idaho, Moscow

University of Idaho, Moscow

University of Idaho, Moscow

University of Idaho, Moscow


Of course, there were also some significant sporting facilities, including a sports dome - of very little interest to me. Moving on, it was odd to find another country based University just 9 miles away - the Washington State University in Pullman. It must have been an odd sort of place to put a University, as there were no roads at all - the only way to get to Pullman was by rail, and from there to the Uni, instead of a yellow brick road, there was a red brick road - just a couple of blocks of these 100 year old streets still exist.
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Driving through the campus meant we both missed Pullman and became very lost - the GPS lady was taking us into smaller and smaller country roads, but she was evidently correct because we finally got ourselves on the way to Lower Granite. To help resolve my brother's disappointment with Lewiston, I found that the locks he was interested in seeing were not actually at Lewiston - there is a sequence of about 15 dams and locks between here and where the Columbia river finally hits the sea - and a pretty flash rivercruise boat will take you through for about $3,000. Lower Granite is the first of the them. It is actually run by the Army, and we had to get security clearance to drive across the top of the dam and were under very strict instructions not to stop or take photos, so I have no photo of the lock (it had no traffic while we were there, so there wasn't much to see anyway. The dam had a Visitor Centre, one wall of which was glass, to allow people to see fish swimming upriver - there is a ladder which allows them to get through the dam. A woman was sitting in a wee concrete cubicle, knitting - my brother got talking to her: she actually sits there all day counting and classifying the salmon going through. When she takes a break, a video camera takes over - it ocurred to me that it would be so much more efficient to just video the whole time, rather than have people counting in real time, given that I think about three salmon went through the whole time we were there.
Lower Granite Dam

Lower Granite Dam


Lower Granite Dam

Lower Granite Dam


Lower Granite Dam

Lower Granite Dam


Lower Granite Dam

Lower Granite Dam


Lower Granite Lake

Lower Granite Lake


Salmon Ladder, Lower Granite Dam

Salmon Ladder, Lower Granite Dam

We didn't find much reason to stop for the next 320 miles, except for Yakima ("the Palm Springs of Washington"). This is a name legendary in one particular circle - the craft brewing movement, because about 70% of all hops grown in the US come from the Yakima valley. It also has about 100 wineries and is very big on other fruits and veges. I first came across the name Yakima several years ago in a bar in Westport, where I bought a dark beer called Yakima - I thought it was Japanese but was put right. Then a young fellow I talked to back in Port Angeles had left there to try his luck in Yakima and mentioned the hops - I don't think he liked it very much, because he described the area as a desert! Anyway, I made sure we went through and yes, there were hops (there were also cows in feedlots I was made to stop at). Every year (but not while we were there) Yakima has a Fresh Hop Ale Festival in October - it looks a lot like the one I go to in Nelson, Marchfest, where brewers make brews using the latest crop of hops.
Hops @ Yakima Valley

Hops @ Yakima Valley


Hops @ Yakima Valley

Hops @ Yakima Valley


Yakima town was actually a good place - we were only there for coffee but ended up walking through the whole town before finding any, so I didn't have my camera with me. Interesting fact about Yakima: the residents and the railroad had a huge fight in the 1880's which saw the railroad set up shop four miles out of town. The good people of Yakima had to accept the importance of the railroad, so moved the whole town (about 100 buildings) on rollers made from logs - I think the railrod won that battle. I'm not sure if that was the same rail station that is still there - it is where we finally found some good coffee, and a very interesting looking wood panelled restaurant/bar - but I do know the railroad has moved its station again. There were various old buildings clustered around the station we visitied - probably part of the big move.
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After that, it was a simple matter of retracing our steps through to Seattle on the I-90, with a pause for dinner at Olive Garden - food was OK, but the service was outstanding. When we got there they told us there'd be an hour's wait, and gave us one of those wee discs that sings and vibrates. We wandered over to the mall - I managed to drop the disc thing in some water, and it started making these strangled beeping noises, but it turnd out that we were actually being summoned back to the restaurant - I hadn't realised they had such a range. Another night in the same Motel 6 we started in, and I dropped my brother at the airport at an extreme early hour and our shared trip was over.
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This is the longest time I've travelled (or indeed spent) with anyone since I was a kid: before we left, we had both seen the same article about being careful who you travel with and how travel can test relationships - apart from one tiny squabble when I was barely awake and being asked to pay attention, all seemed to go fine - a lot of the time we wanted to see the same things

Posted by NZBarry 19:20 Archived in USA Comments (0)

Following the Snake River: Boise ID - Moscow ID

sunny 26 °C

Boise featured strongly in my brother's plans, mainly because he thought it is the potato capital of the world and really wanted to see some potatonalia. Sadly, it was not even the potato capital of Idaho - that would be Blackfoot, near where we started the day's travels. Blackfoot has a very highly rated potato museum, which claims to "lead you through the revolution of the potato industry" and has the largest potato chip on display. Most interesting of all, they have chocolate covered potato chips which look pretty good.
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Since leaving Boise, I have heard of Florenceville, New Brunswick being the big cheese of the potato world - it is where McCains started, claims the title of French Fry Capital of the World and boasts the Potato World museum. No sign of any chocolate chips, however. There is a Big Potato in the Idaho Historical Museumin Boise but the museum was closed for renovations.

So we wandered downtown Boise for a bit, didn't really see much to admire except for the State Capitol, which had a tableau of Chief Twisted Hair of the Nez Perce people talking with Lewis and Clark in 1804, and headed for the Whole Foods for breakfast (where I got a bit of stick for having chicken curry). Thinking ahead, we had them make some fabulous sandwiches which kept us going.
Idaho Capitol, Boise

Idaho Capitol, Boise


Chief Twisted Hair, Lewis and Clark

Chief Twisted Hair, Lewis and Clark

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The drive for the day didn't have anything spectacular like the Beartooth Pass but all in all it was a nicely varied drive, a combination of forested ravines, big sunburnt hills and prairie - about 300 miles in all. We followed the Payette River which fed into the Snake River as we headed north up ID-55 and then rejoined US-95. Not far out of Boise we caught up with the Thunder Mountain Line train, which does a 15 mile trip up the river. The river is a pretty major destination for white water rafting and, where it is calmer, paddle-boarding and kayaking.
Heading out of Boise ID

Heading out of Boise ID


Thunder Mountain Line

Thunder Mountain Line


Thunder Mountain Line

Thunder Mountain Line


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The paddle-boarder had a lot of trouble getting up on the board and came close to falling in several times although never actually did before the triumph seen in the last photo. The road took us into McCall which was so pretty we had to stop and wander around and try out the Fogg Lifter cafe - which was rather more like a living room than a cafe. Nice place, even of we got hopelessly lost leaving, because we had no idea we were actually on the road we wanted, so tried some others.
McCall ID

McCall ID


McCall ID

McCall ID


McCall ID

McCall ID


Fogg Lifter Cafe, McCall ID

Fogg Lifter Cafe, McCall ID


Fogg Lifter Cafe, McCall ID

Fogg Lifter Cafe, McCall ID


Fogg Lifter Cafe, McCall ID

Fogg Lifter Cafe, McCall ID


The road took us up past the Nez Perce forest and then a place called Grangeville: as we drove, I started to realise that I had been before, certainly the Nez Perce territory was looking familiar and I remembered going into Grangeville and thinking it was a dump.
Riggins ID

Riggins ID


White Bird ID

White Bird ID


White Bird ID

White Bird ID


Nez Perce territory, ID

Nez Perce territory, ID


Nez Perce Country

Nez Perce Country


The land flattened out as we went through the Camas prairie, which was intersected by the Lapwai Canyon - which required some rather large wooden trestles to let the Camas Prairie Railroad through.
Camas Prairie

Camas Prairie


Camas Prairie Railroad Wooden Bridge

Camas Prairie Railroad Wooden Bridge

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The big reason for coming this way was my brother's desire to see the locks and shipping at the major inland port of Lewiston. Poor bugger, because there were no locks and not much more shipping - this is how busy it was.
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Lewiston was a funny sort of place - across the river from the main road, there were several small big-box shopping areas ascending the hill, with a defunct Walmart perched at the top. The small historic district was on a bend in the river and looked like it might have been worth a look, but we didn't really stop - got hassled by some young guys hooning around who apparently had driven up from California, and this was all they could find to do. The Motel 6 was cheap, so I would have been OK to stay but we decided to carry on. The drive out of town was spectacular.
Bridge @ Lewiston

Bridge @ Lewiston


Road above Lewiston

Road above Lewiston


Road above Lewiston

Road above Lewiston


Road above Lewiston

Road above Lewiston


Leaving was probably the right thing to do, as it meant we could stay in the very pleasant town of Moscow, a place I really enjoyed on my last visit to this part of the world, and home base of the University of Idaho. Oddly, despite being Saturday night, town was very quiet - a combination I guess of most students being too young to drink and many of them leaving town for the long weekend. It isn't a very big place, but it has a wonderful modern Italian restaurant - Maialina - where the staff was very careful to point out that they didn't make doughy, cheese-soaked slabs of crap. The waiter may have been a bit full of himselfbut it really was good food.

Posted by NZBarry 21:28 Archived in USA Tagged roadtrip_2014 Comments (0)

Jackson WY - Boise ID

sunny 26 °C

Jackson meant nothing to me when I booked the hotel there, it was just a convenient stopping point for when we came out the south end of Yellowstone. It turned out to be delightful, essentially a resort town, so there were lots of shops and galleries selling art, t-shirt shops, some outdoorswear shops selling the kind of outdoorswear that you wear to the pub to show you love the outdoors but would be unsafe to wear outdoors (where the weather might actually get a bit extreme), a hat shop where I could have bought a handmade hat, had I been prepared to stump up a minimum of $650. But it was relaxed and had at least one great cafe (others looked good as we walked around but we didn't check them out) and very close to the mountains - a ski slope actually terminated on the edge of town. Although the official name is Jackson, it had at one point been called Jackson Hole, and despite the less than salubrious resonances, many proudly label their businesses and the like as being in Jackson Hole.

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Broadway, Jackson

Broadway, Jackson

Arts Centre, Jackson, WY

Arts Centre, Jackson, WY

Jackson Hole Coffee Roasters

Jackson Hole Coffee Roasters

Jackson Hole Coffee Roasters

Jackson Hole Coffee Roasters

large_WP_20140829_004.jpglarge_WP_20140829_005.jpgTransport, Jackson style

Transport, Jackson style

At the bottom of the ski slope, we noticed a tunnel, which went straight into the mountain

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We had to see where it went - it curved upwards

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and when we got out of the tunnel (it was only a couple of hundred metres), we saw lots of these

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The side of the mountain was a pretty exclusive housing development, there are several streets running along the side of hill which have similarly big houses, and yet, apart from the first one, they are invisible

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Jackson Square was a nice place to hang out - there was some sort of umbrella thing happening in the square itself and, on one of its bordering streets, an exhibition of performing arts - I only noticed as one act was finishing and another didn't start before it was time to go. There was also a fair amount of street art

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Early settlers

Early settlers

Enjoying the sun @ Jackson

Enjoying the sun @ Jackson

Sitting about @ Jackson

Sitting about @ Jackson

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The arch is made up of elk antlers - they have some sort of campaign to get people go out and collect them after they drop from natural causes, which somehow works to stop hunting. We left town but didn't get very far - a sign to Teton Village distracted us - I was thinking we'd be able to get a cold drink or the like, and really had no idea of what we would find

Lodge @ Teton Village

Lodge @ Teton Village

Jackson Hole Aerial Tram

Jackson Hole Aerial Tram

Ski Lift @ Teton Village

Ski Lift @ Teton Village


Teton Village, WY

Teton Village, WY

Teton Village

Teton Village

Arts Centre, Teton Village

Arts Centre, Teton Village

Apparently it is one of the best ski resorts in the world - at least one of the guides to such things we consulted put it at # 1. Even I, a complete non-skier, was impressed - massive lodges, several ski lifts as well as a gondola and an aerial tram. We were there in summer, but there were still plenty of people about, some to mountain bike but most, I suspect, to linger.

Our nest stop was about two hours later, to investigate Idaho Falls, We'd been through a couple of places with falls in their name but no actual waterfalls to be seen (hello, Columbus Falls) so I was a bit suspicious, but ended up impressed. The Idaho Falls do not fall very far, but they are right in the centre of town and very wide, generating electricity for more than 100 years.

Idaho Falls, ID, USA

Idaho Falls, ID, USA

Idaho Falls

Idaho Falls

Idaho Falls

Idaho Falls

Three hundred miles of very boring driving then confronted us - we could have taken the Interstate which would have been a wee bit quicker but could find no reason at all to stop, so took US-20 - which offered us the chance of stopping at the Craters of the Moon National Monument - since it was a monument not a park, I thought there's be a wee visitor's centre or the like, but it is actually 620 square miles: a " vast ocean of lava flows with scattered islands of cinder cones and sagebrush ... [a] weird and scenic landscape" according to the National Park Service.

Harvesting in Swan Valley

Harvesting in Swan Valley

Snake River

Snake River

Craters of the Moon, ID

Craters of the Moon, ID

Craters of the Moon, ID

Craters of the Moon, ID

Craters of the Moon, ID

Craters of the Moon, ID

Craters of the Moon, ID

Craters of the Moon, ID

Craters of the Moon, ID

Craters of the Moon, ID

Craters of the Moon, ID

Craters of the Moon, ID

Craters of the Moon, ID

Craters of the Moon, ID

Craters of the Moon, ID

Craters of the Moon, ID

Craters of the Moon, ID

Craters of the Moon, ID

Craters of the Moon

Craters of the Moon

There is, of course, also the National Laboratory - a nuclear reactor museum ("Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 1 (EBR-I) Atomic Museum") but we had left it a bit late in the day to visit. Eventually, we made it to Boise, where a very helpful chap at the Holiday Inn printed out a list of eating establishments, which led to us having a most excellent dinner at the Bittercreek Ale House.

Bittercreek Ale House

Bittercreek Ale House

Posted by NZBarry 13:47 Archived in USA Comments (0)

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